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Post image for Nurse Manager Immigration Schedule A EB2 I-140 Approval for Filipina Beneficiary and Nursing Care Facility Petitioner in Katy, Texas

CASE: I-140 (EB-2 Category) / Schedule A / Premium Processing

EMPLOYER: Nursing Care Facility

BENEFICIARY: Filipina

LOCATION: Houston, Texas

Our client is in the United States on an H-4 visa. Her prospective employer-sponsor was willing to petition her for a second-preference employment immigrant visa petition (I-140). Since she has a registered nurse license and the proffered position for her is a nurse manager at the nursing care facility, the petitioner wanted to try going for a “Schedule A” classification. They also wanted to do EB2 (requiring at least a Masters degree or Bachelors degree + 5 yrs experience).

The Department of Labor (DOL) maintains a schedule of occupations in its regulations, Schedule A included, for which the individual permanent labor certification procedure is not required. The schedule of pre-certified occupations is referred to as Schedule A, and is included in DOL regulations at 20 CFR 656.10. Based on an occupation’s inclusion on Schedule A, an employer may file an immigrant visa petition (I-140) directly with the (USCIS) without having to file a Labor Certification with the Department of Labor. Usually, prior to filing I-140 petitions (EB-2 or EB-3 category), the employer must file a Labor Certification to the Department of Labor. However, for Schedule A cases, the employer does not have to go through the labor certification process. We argued that the position of Health Services Manager should be classified under Schedule A. We argued that it falls under the broad spectrum of “professional nurse” occupations. We also argued that the job description has excerpts that fall under “professional nurse” and that the description justifies the requirements also of Bachelor’s degree in nursing and five years of related experiences.

Our client has a Bachelor’s degree in nursing and 5 years of experience as a staff nurse. She also has a registered nursing license in the state of Texas. Our office was retained and we started on the Prevailing Wage Determination filing and other related matters.

Once the prevailing wage was determined, we filed the I-140 application on February 22, 2017 via premium processing. We included a job offer letter, the notice of filing, employment letter, and other necessary supporting documents. In our cover brief, we included the “ability to pay” argument and why the nurse manager position falls under a Schedule A and EB2 designation.

Eventually, on March 8, 2017, the USCIS Texas Service Center approved her EB-2 I-140 petition. Now, with the approved EB-2 I-140 petition (priority date for EB2 Philippines nationals is current), she can file an adjustment of status application.

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CASE: I-485 based on Approved I-140 (EB-3 Category) / Schedule A

APPLICANT: Mexican Registered Nurse

LOCATION: Midland, Texas

Our client’s beneficiary is a registered nurse from Mexico licensed in the state of Texas. She came to the United States and currently works in the United States on her TN visa.  Her current employer was willing to petition her for a third-preference employment immigrant visa petition (I-140).

Since she is a registered nurse, she is eligible for “Schedule A” classification. The Department of Labor (DOL) maintains a schedule of occupations in its regulations, Schedule A included, for which the individual permanent labor certification procedure is not required. The schedule of pre-certified occupations is referred to as Schedule A, and is included in DOL regulations at 20 CFR 656.10. Based on an occupation’s inclusion on Schedule A, an employer may file an immigrant visa petition (I-140) directly with the (USCIS) without first going to the DOL for a labor certification. Usually, prior to filing I-140 petitions (EB-2 or EB-3 category), the employer must file a Labor Certification to the Department of Labor. However, for Schedule A cases, the employer does not have to go through the labor certification process. The position of Professional Nurses is included in Schedule A.

Our client has a Bachelor’s of Nursing degree from a U.S. institution and has worked for the sponsor-employer. Our firm told her that her employer can petition her as a Registered Nurse under the schedule A category. Our office was retained on December 2, 2015 and started on her Prevailing Wage Request.

We filed the I-140 application on March 23, 2016 via premium processing. We included the job offer letter, the notice of filing, and other necessary supporting documents.  However, on April 4, 2016, the USCIS issued a Request for Evidence (RFE) and requested our client to submit documents to prove her employer’s “ability to pay” standard. Our client’s employer provided a federal corporate tax record and other documents to demonstrate that they have ability to pay our client’s proffered wage. Our office filed the response to RFE on April 29, 2016. Eventually, the I-140 was approved on May 11, 2016.

In September 2016, her priority date became current. Our office proceeded with our client’s and her husband’s I-485 adjustment of status applications. We prepared and file our clients’ adjustment of status applications along with supporting documents to USCIS on September 7, 2016. Everything went smoothly and the receipt notices, fingerprint appointment, and work permits all came on time.

This case was transferred to the local USCIS office in El Paso, TX and they appeared at the interview for the adjustment of status interview with Attorney Sung Hee (Glen) Yu from our office on February 9, 2017.  The interview went well; eventually, our client’s adjustment application was approved by the USCIS on February 13, 2017.  

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Post image for Nurse Practitioner EB-2 Schedule A I-140 Approval for Thai Beneficiary and Non-Profit Mental Health Care Petitioner in Ohio

CASE: I-140 (EB-2 Category) / Schedule A / Premium Processing

EMPLOYER: Mental Health Non-Profit Organization

BENEFICIARY: Thai Nurse Practitioner

LOCATION: Ohio

Our client is a certified nurse practitioner. Her prospective employer was willing to petition her for a second-preference employment immigrant visa petition (I-140). Since she was a certified nurse practitioner, she was eligible for “Schedule A” classification.

The Department of Labor (DOL) maintains a schedule of occupations in its regulations, Schedule A included, for which the individual permanent labor certification procedure is not required. The schedule of pre-certified occupations is referred to as Schedule A, and is included in DOL regulations at 20 CFR 656.10. Based on an occupation’s inclusion on Schedule A, an employer may file an immigrant visa petition (I-140) directly with the (USCIS) without first going to the DOL for a labor certification. Usually, prior to filing I-140 petitions (EB-2 or EB-3 category), the employer must file a Labor Certification to the Department of Labor. However, for Schedule A cases, the employer does not have to go through the labor certification process. The position of Nurse Practitioner is included in Schedule A.

Our client has a Bachelors and Masters degree in nursing and is a certified Nurse Practitioner. Our office was retained on September 12, 2016 and we filed the Prevailing Wage Determination immediately.

We filed the I-140 application on January 23, 2017 via premium processing. We included the job offer letter, the notice of filing, employment letter, and other necessary supporting documents.

In our cover brief, we included the “ability to pay” argument and why nurse practitioners must fall under the Schedule A designation.  On January 31, 2017, without any Request for Evidence (RFE), the USCIS Nebraska Service Center approved her EB-2 I-140 petition. Since the priority date for Thai national is current for the EB-2 category, she is eligible to file her adjustment of status application now.

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Post image for H-1B Nurse Practitioner Extension Approval for Physician’s Office in New York, Chinese Beneficiary in New York

CASE: H-1B Visa Extension

PETITIONER:  Physician’s Office in Flushing, NY

BENEFICIARY: Chinese Nurse Practitioner

Our client is a dermatology clinic in Flushing, NY which provides cosmetic and dermatologic treatments for its patients. They contacted our office in July of 2016 to seek legal assistance for its foreign beneficiary’s H-1B extension.

The beneficiary is from China and obtained her Master of Nursing Degree in the United States. She also has a valid Nurse Practitioner License in the State of New York. The proffered position for the Beneficiary was for a Nurse Practitioner which we argued qualified as a specialty occupation. We proffered that the minimum requirement for this position is a Master of Nursing Degree or its equivalent. Moreover, Nurse Practitioner needs the state license as well.  She has been working for the Petitioner on a valid H-1B visa.

Once retained, our firm prepared and eventually filed the H-1B visa petition with various supporting documents on August 16, 2016 via regular processing. Eventually, without any RFE, our client’s H-1B extension was approved on November 22, 2016. Now, the Beneficiary can continue to work for the Petitioner on an H-1B status until September 1, 2019 (until her duration of H-1B status reaches the 6th year mark).

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Post image for EB-2 Nurse Practitioner Green Card Approval for Canadian Client in Chicago Illinois

CASE: I-485 Adjustment of Status / I-140 (EB-2 Category) / Schedule A

APPLICANT: Canadian Nurse Practitioner

LOCATION: Chicago, IL

Our client is a family nurse practitioner. Her current employer was willing to petition her for a second-preference employment immigrant visa petition (I-140). Since she was a family nurse practitioner, she was eligible for “Schedule A” classification.

The Department of Labor (DOL) maintains a schedule of occupations in its regulations, Schedule A included, for which the individual permanent labor certification procedure is not required. The schedule of pre-certified occupations is referred to as Schedule A, and is included in DOL regulations at 20 CFR 656.10. Based on an occupation’s inclusion on Schedule A, an employer may file an immigrant visa petition (I-140) directly with the (USCIS) without first going to the DOL for a labor certification. Usually, prior to filing I-140 petitions (EB-2 or EB-3 category), the employer must file a Labor Certification to the Department of Labor. However, for Schedule A cases, the employer does not have to go through the labor certification process. The position of Nurse Practitioner is included in Schedule A.

Our client has Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in nursing and is a certified Nurse Practitioner. Our office was retained and we filed the Prevailing Wage Determination on September 18, 2015.

We filed the I-140 application on January 25, 2016 via premium processing. We included the job offer letter, the notice of filing, employment letter, and other necessary supporting documents.

In our cover brief, we included the “ability to pay” argument and why nurse practitioners must fall under the Schedule A designation.  On February 1, 2016, without any Request for Evidence (RFE), the USCIS Nebraska Service Center approved her EB-2 I-140 petition.

Once the I-140 petition was approved, our client retained our office again for her and her husband’s I-485 adjustment of status applications. Our office filed an I-485 adjustment of status applications for our client and her husband on March 3, 2016. Everything went smoothly and the receipt notices and fingerprint appointment came on time.

Eventually, on October 17, 2016, the USCIS Nebraska Service Center approved our clients’ adjustment of status applications. Now, she finally is a green card holder.

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Post image for Nurse Manager Immigration Schedule A EB2 I-140 Approval for Filipina Beneficiary and Nursing Care Facility Petitioner in Houston, TX

CASE: I-140 (EB-2 Category) / Schedule A / Premium Processing

EMPLOYER: Nursing Care Facility

BENEFICIARY: Filipina

LOCATION: Beneficiary: Philippines / Petitioner: Houston, TX

Our client is in the Philippines. Her prospective employer-sponsor is willing to petition her for a second-preference employment immigrant visa petition (I-140). Since she has a registered nurse license and the proffered position for her is a nurse manager at the nursing care facility, the petition wanted to try going for a “Schedule A” classification. They also wanted to do EB2 (requiring at least a Masters degree or Bachelors degree + 5 yrs experience).

The Department of Labor (DOL) maintains a schedule of occupations in its regulations, Schedule A included, for which the individual permanent labor certification procedure is not required. The schedule of pre-certified occupations is referred to as Schedule A, and is included in DOL regulations at 20 CFR 656.10. Based on an occupation’s inclusion on Schedule A, an employer may file an immigrant visa petition (I-140) directly with the (USCIS) without having to file a Labor Certification with the Department of Labor. Usually, prior to filing I-140 petitions (EB-2 or EB-3 category), the employer must file a Labor Certification to the Department of Labor. However, for Schedule A cases, the employer does not have to go through the labor certification process. We argued that the position of Health Services Manager should be classified under Schedule A. We argued that it falls under the broad spectrum of “professional nurse” occupations. We also argued that the job description has excerpts that fall under “professional nurse” and that the description justifies the requirements also of Bachelor’s degree in nursing and five years of related experiences.

Our client has a Bachelor’s degree in nursing and 5 years of experience as a staff nurse. She also has a registered nursing license in the state of Texas. Our office was retained and we started on the Prevailing Wage Determination filing and other related matters.

Once the prevailing wage was determined, we filed the I-140 application on September 20, 2016 via premium processing. We included a job offer letter, the notice of filing, employment letter, and other necessary supporting documents. In our cover brief, we included the “ability to pay” argument and why the nurse manager position falls under a Schedule A and EB2 designation.

Eventually, on September 29, 2016, the USCIS Texas Service Center approved her EB-2 I-140 petition. Now, with the approved EB-2 I-140 petition (priority date for EB2 Philippines nationals is current), she can file immigrant visa in the Philippines.

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Post image for EB2 Green Card Approval for Chinese Nurse Practitioner in Houston Texas

CASE: I-485 based on Approved I-140 (EB-2)

APPLICANT: Chinese Nurse Practitioner

LOCATION: Houston, Texas

Our client is a nurse practitioner from China, who is currently working at a large hospital which was willing to petition her for a second-preference petition (I-140). She has maintained her status as an H-1B visa holder in the United States.  She had an approved I-140 petition which was filed by her current employer and this I-140 petition’s priority date was December 31, 2007.

In July 2016, she contacted our office and retained us for her I-485 adjustment of status application. Our office filed an I-485 adjustment of status application for our client on July 22, 2016. Everything went smoothly and the receipt notices and fingerprint appointment came on time.

Eventually, on September 22, 2016, the USCIS Texas Service Center approved our client’s adjustment of status application. She is now a green card holder.

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Post image for Nurse Practitioner EB-2 Schedule A I-140 Approval for Polish Beneficiary and Physician’s Office Petitioner in New Jersey

CASE: I-140 (EB-2 Category) / Schedule A / Premium Processing

EMPLOYER: Physician’s Office

BENEFICIARY: Polish Nurse Practitioner

LOCATION: New Jersey

Our client is a certified nurse practitioner. Her current employer was willing to petition her for a second-preference employment immigrant visa petition (I-140). Since she was a certified nurse practitioner, she was eligible for “Schedule A” classification.

The Department of Labor (DOL) maintains a schedule of occupations in its regulations, Schedule A included, for which the individual permanent labor certification procedure is not required. The schedule of pre-certified occupations is referred to as Schedule A, and is included in DOL regulations at 20 CFR 656.10. Based on an occupation’s inclusion on Schedule A, an employer may file an immigrant visa petition (I-140) directly with the (USCIS) without first going to the DOL for a labor certification. Usually, prior to filing I-140 petitions (EB-2 or EB-3 category), the employer must file a Labor Certification to the Department of Labor. However, for Schedule A cases, the employer does not have to go through the labor certification process. The position of Nurse Practitioner is included in Schedule A.

Our client has Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in nursing and is a certified Nurse Practitioner. Once our office was retained, we filed the Prevailing Wage Determination immediately.

We filed the I-140 application on August 1, 2016 via premium processing. We included the job offer letter, the notice of filing, employment letter, and other necessary supporting documents.

In our cover brief, we included the “ability to pay” argument and why nurse practitioners must fall under the Schedule A designation.  However, on August 15, 2016, the USCIS issued Request for Evidence (RFE) and requested our client to submit the missing copy of prevailing wage determination document. Our office immediately responded back to USCIS.  Eventually, on August 29, 2016, the USCIS approved her EB-2 I-140 petition. She is eligible to file her adjustment of status application once her priority date becomes current.

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Post image for EB-2 Nurse Practitioner Schedule A Green Card Approval for Taiwanese in Brooklyn New York

CASE: I-485 Adjustment of Status  / Schedule A

APPLICANT: Taiwanese

LOCATION: Brooklyn, NY

Our client is a family nurse practitioner. Her current employer was willing to petition her for a second-preference employment immigrant visa petition (I-140). Since she was a family nurse practitioner, she was eligible for “Schedule A” classification.

The Department of Labor (DOL) maintains a schedule of occupations in its regulations, Schedule A included, for which the individual permanent labor certification procedure is not required. The schedule of pre-certified occupations is referred to as Schedule A, and is included in DOL regulations at 20 CFR 656.10. Based on an occupation’s inclusion on Schedule A, an employer may file an immigrant visa petition (I-140) directly with the (USCIS) without first going to the DOL for a labor certification. Usually, prior to filing I-140 petitions (EB-2 or EB-3 category), the employer must file a Labor Certification to the Department of Labor. However, for Schedule A cases, the employer does not have to go through the labor certification process. The position of Nurse Practitioner is included in Schedule A.

Our client has a Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in nursing and is a certified Nurse Practitioner. Our office was retained on December 17, 2015 and we filed the Prevailing Wage Determination immediately.

We filed the I-140 application on March 17, 2016 via premium processing. We included the job offer letter, the notice of filing, employment letter, and other necessary supporting documents.

In our cover brief, we included the “ability to pay” argument and why nurse practitioners must fall under the Schedule A designation.  On March 25, 2016, without any Request for Evidence (RFE), the USCIS Nebraska Service Center approved her EB-2 I-140 petition.

Once the I-140 petition was approved, our client retained our office again for her I-485 adjustment of status application. Our office filed an I-485 adjustment of status application for our client on April 21, 2016. Everything went smoothly and the receipt notices and fingerprint appointment came on time.

Eventually, on June 30, 2016, the USCIS Texas Service Center approved our client’s adjustment of status application. Now, she finally is a green card holder.

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Post image for Immigrant Visa Based on Taekwondo EB-11 Alien of Extraordinary Ability I-140 Immigration Approval for Korean Taekwondo Coach in Seoul, South Korea

CASE: Immigrant Visa / Consular Processing based on Approved I-140 / EB-11 (Alien of extraordinary ability)

CLIENT: Korean

LOCATION: Seoul, South Korea

Our client contacted us in September 2014 about the possibility of getting an immigrant visa through EB-11 category. He is a world-renowned Taekwondo coach and is currently working as a coach for a university Taekwondo team in South Korea.  Our client was a coach for the Great Britain’s Taekwondo Team in preparation of its Summer Olympic competitions. Also, he wrote one of the first Taekwondo guidance books for the Taekwondo instructors. Moreover, he has multiple patents after he invented an effective exercise band for Taekwondo training. Upon review of his credentials and qualifications, our office determined that he was qualified for the EB-11 category, an alien of extraordinary ability.

According to the INA Section 203(b) states, in pertinent part, that:

  1. Priority workers – visas shall first be made available… to qualified immigrants who are aliens described in any of the following sub-paragraphs (A) through (C):
  1. Aliens with extraordinary – an alien is described in this sub-paragraph if-
  1. The alien has extraordinary ability in the sciences, arts, education, business, or athletes which has been demonstrated by sustained national or international acclaim and whose achievements have been recognized in the field through extensive documentation,
  2. The alien seeks to enter the United States to continue work in the area of extraordinary ability, and
  3. The alien’s entry into the United States will substantially benefit prospectively the United States.

USCIS has consistently recognized that Congress intended to set a very high standard for individuals seeking immigrant visas as aliens of extraordinary ability.  See H.R. 723 101st Cong.2d Sess. 59 (1990); 56 Fed. Reg. 60897, 60898-99 (Nov. 29, 1991).  The term “extraordinary ability” refers only to those individuals in that small percentage who have risen to the very top of the field of endeavor. Id. And 8 C.F.R. § 204.5(h)(2).

The regulation at 8 C.F.R. § 204.5(h)(3) requires that an alien demonstrate his or her sustained acclaim and the recognition of his or her achievements in the field.  Such acclaim and achievements must be established either through evidence of a one-time achievement (that is, a major international recognized award) or through meeting at least three of the following ten categories of evidence:

  1. Documentation of the alien’s receipt of lesser nationally or internationally recognized prizes or awards for excellence in the field of endeavor;
  1. Documentation of the alien’s membership in associations in the field for which classification is sought, which require outstanding achievements of their members, as judged by recognized national or international experts in their disciplines or fields;
  1. Published material about the alien in professional or major trade publications or other major media, relating to the alien’s work in the field for which classification is sought.  Such evidence shall include the title, date, and author of the material, and any necessary translation;
  1. Evidence of the alien’s participation, either individually or on a panel, as a judge of the work of others in the same or an allied field of specialization for which classification is sought;
  1. Evidence of the alien’s original scientific, scholarly, artistic, athletic, or business-related contributions of major significance in the field;
  1. Evidence of the alien’s authorship of scholarly articles in the field, in professional or major trade publications or other major media;
  1. Evidence of the display of the alien’s work in the field at an artistic exhibitions or showcases;
  1. Evidence that the alien has performed in a leading or critical role for organizations or establishments that have a distinguished reputation;
  1. Evidence that the alien has commanded a high salary or other significantly high remuneration for services, in relation to others in the field; or
  1. Evidence of commercial successes in the performing arts, as shown by box office receipts or record, cassette, compact disk, or video sales.

After the review of our client’s credentials and qualifications, we determined that our client meets 5 of the 10 categories, which is more than 3 required as an alien of extraordinary ability. Our client has made an original contribution to the sport of Taekwondo; has been awarded numerous national and international coaching awards and his student-players have won numerous national and international competitions; has played a critical role for distinguished organizations; has a membership in an organization with distinguished reputation that requires outstanding achievement; and our client’s participation as a panel or judge of the elite Taekwondo athletes.   

Our office prepared a 16-page brief for our client’s EB-11 filing. Our client also obtained 6 letters of recommendation from World Taekwondo Federation, Korea Taekwondo Association, a former Olympic champion, Taekwondo head coaches from other national teams, etc. Our office also included his coaching records, awards, media coverage, medals, athletic career records, and other materials to show that he is an alien of extraordinary ability in Taekwondo coaching. His EB-11 I-140 application contained 50 exhibits.

Our office filed his I-140 (EB-11) petition to the USCIS Nebraska Service Center via premium processing service on July 23, 2015. However, on August 12, 2015, the USCIS Nebraska Service Center issued the Request for Evidence (RFE). In the RFE, the USCIS claims that our client only meets 2 of the 10 requisite statutory categories of EB-11. In the response brief, our office demonstrated that our client indeed meets 5 of the 10 categories and provided more recommendation letters from independent experts, copies of his publication records, copies of his patent certificate, copies of coaching awards, and media coverage. Our office filed the response to RFE on October 28, 2015. Eventually, on November 10, 2015, the USCIS Nebraska Service Center approved his I-140 self-petition.

Once his I-140 was approved, our client retained our office again for his and his family members’ immigrant visa processing. Once we were retained, our office filed the immigrant visa packets to the National Visa Center on January 26, 2016, who in turn forwarded the client’s materials to the U.S. Embassy in Seoul, South Korea. An interview notice was set for the client at the U.S. Embassy in Seoul. On May 24, 2016, our client, his wife, and their three sons appeared at the U.S. Embassy in Seoul, South Korea The interview went well, and on the same day, the U.S. Embassy in Seoul, South Korea approved and issued his and his family members’ immigrant visas.

With the approved Immigrant visas, our client and his family members can come to the United States immediately, and they will get their green cards within two months of entry.

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