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From Our Clients
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Asylum
Past persecution or fear of future persecution on account of politics, race, religion, social group, or nationality. Let us guide you in the asylum application process.
Post image for Asylum Approval for Chinese Client (Political Opinion) at the New York Immigration Court

CASE: Asylum in Immigration Court

CLIENT: Chinese

LOCATION: New York Immigration Court

Our Chinese client came to the United States on a F-1 visa in July 2012.  He was persecuted and harmed in China based on his political opinion and political activism, so within one year of his entry, he filed an asylum application (Asylum, Withholding of Removal, and relief under the CAT) to the USCIS with our office’s legal assistance.  He was interviewed at the Asylum Office in Lyndhurst, NJ in February 2013, but his case was referred to an immigration judge. The Notice to Appear was issued and our client was placed in removal proceedings.  

After the case was referred to the Immigration Court, our client retained our office again.

Our client was scared to go back home to China, fearing that he will be persecuted based on his political opinion and his past political speech. While our client was in China, he made political speech in public and expressed his ideas regarding democracy in China. As a result, he was arrested and detained by the Chinese police and has experienced harm and mistreatments in numerous occasions.  

We helped him prepare his asylum application and represented him in immigration court hearings. We also asked him to provide supporting documents corroborating his claim, some of which were a letter from his father, colleagues and friends in China and medical documents of our client’s psychological health. Our firm also did some research on articles related to his claim, and the type of persecution he will experience in China if sent back.

Our client’s individual hearing was scheduled on December 19, 2016, at the New York Immigration Court. Attorney Sung Hee (Glen) Yu represented our client at the hearing. During the hearing, our client testified credibly as to his past persecution in China and likelihood of future persecution. After the hearing, the Immigration Judge granted asylum relief for our client. He is now an asylee who will get his work permit soon and will be eligible to apply for permanent residency in one year.

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Post image for Political Asylum Approved for Cameroonian Client at the Cleveland Immigration Court

CASE: Asylum in Immigration Court

CLIENT: Cameroonian

LOCATION: Cleveland Immigration Court

Our Cameroonian client came to the United States on a B-2 visitor’s visa in November 2013 with her minor daughter.  She was persecuted and harmed in Cameroon based on her political opinion and political activism, so within one year of her entry, she filed an asylum application (Asylum, Withholding of Removal, and relief under the CAT) to the USCIS.  She was interviewed at the Asylum Office, but her case was referred to an immigration judge. The Notice to Appear was issued and our client was placed in removal proceedings.  The USCIS thought that our client’s testimony was different from that of her written statement.

After the case was referred to the Immigration Court, our client contacted our office in early January of 2015, and eventually retained our office on January 20, 2015.  

Our client was scared to go back home to Cameroon, fearing that she will be persecuted based on her political opinion and her past participation with human rights activist groups. While our client was a student in Cameroon, she became a human rights activist involved in educating and informing fellow students on campus for their basic fundamental rights. Our client organized some student movement activities, joined student marches against government’s actions and participated in political activities.  As a result, she was arrested and detained multiple times by the Cameroonian police and has experienced harm and mistreatments in numerous occasions.  Moreover, her father was arrested and detained due to his political opinion.

We helped her prepare her asylum application and represented her in immigration court hearings. We also asked her to provide supporting documents corroborating her claim, some of which were a letter from her family members, colleagues and friends in Cameroon, Cameroonian medical documents of our client’s injury, and her membership certification with the different organizations. Our firm also did some research on articles related to her claim, and the type of persecution she will experience in Cameroon if sent back.

Our client’s individual hearing was scheduled on July 24, 2015 at the Cleveland Immigration Court. Attorney Sung Hee (Glen) Yu represented our client at the hearing. During the hearing, our client testified credibly as to her past persecution in Cameroon and likelihood of future persecution.

However, during the cross-examination, the DHS attorney raised an issue of “firm resettlement.” Congress has mandated by statute numerous exceptions and exclusions to the grant of asylum, one being that the applicant has been firmly resettled in another country prior to arriving in the U.S. 8 C.F.R. §§ 2208.13(c)(2)(i)(B). The applicant will be deemed firmly resettled if, prior to arriving in the U.S., he or she entered another country with, or while in that country received, an offer of permanent resident status, citizenship, or some other type of permanent resettlement. 8 C.F.R. § 208.15. The offer must be must be for permanent, not temporary, residence in a third country where the applicant lived peacefully and without restriction. Maharaj v. Gonzales, 450 F.3d 961, 969 (9th Cir. 2006).

In fact, prior to her entry to the U.S., our client lived in Denmark for one year. The DHS alleged that she had a permanent residency in Denmark. Nevertheless, our office filed the brief and supporting documents. In the brief, we argued that our client’s visa and “residence cards” in Denmark were all indications of a temporary status, and based on she not being able to meet the permanent residency requirements, she is clearly was never “firmly resettled”, nor was a permanent resident, nor was offered permanent residency in Denmark.

Eventually, on November 25, 2016, the Immigration Judge granted asylum relief for our client. She is now an asylee who will get her work permit in two weeks and will be eligible to apply for permanent residency in one year.

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Post image for Adjustment of Status Green Card Approval as an Asylee for Saudi Arabian Client in Dallas Texas

CASE: Asylee Adjustment of Status
CLIENT: Saudi Arabian
LOCATION: Dallas, Texas

Our client came to the United States from Saudi Arabia with a B-2 visitor’s visa, and through our legal assistance, he won his asylum application in December 2014.

Under the Immigration and Nationality Act, an asylee may apply for lawful permanent resident status after he or she has been physically present in the United States for a period of one year after the date he or she was granted asylum status. Around February 2016, one year after he got his asylee status in the United States, our client contacted our office again and sought legal assistance for his adjustment of status.  We prepared and filed his I-485 Adjustment of Status Application on March 30, 2016. Everything went smoothly and the receipt notice and fingerprint appointment all came on time. On June 9, 2016, the USCIS approved our client’s Adjustment of Status application. He is now a permanent resident of the United States.

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Post image for Adjustment of Status Green Card Approval as an Asylee for Chinese Client in Cleveland Ohio

CASE: Asylee Adjustment of Status
CLIENT: Chinese
LOCATION: Cleveland, OH

Our client came to the United States from China with a B-2 visa, and through our legal assistance, he was granted asylum in April 2014 by the USCIS.

Under the Immigration and Nationality Act, an asylee may apply for lawful permanent resident status after he or she has been physically present in the United States for a period of one year after the date he or she was granted asylum status. Around April 2015, one year after he got his asylee status in the United States, our client contacted our office again and sought legal assistance for his family members’ adjustment of status along with his application.  We prepared and filed his I-485 Adjustment of Status Application on July 15, 2015. Everything went smoothly and the receipt notice and fingerprint appointment all came on time. On December 8, 2015, the USCIS approved our client’s Adjustment of Status application. He is now a permanent resident of the United States. His family members also got their green cards.

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Post image for Gay / Homosexual Asylum Approval for Saudi Arabian Client from Dallas Texas

CASE: Asylum

CLIENT: Saudi Arabian

LOCATION: Dallas for Client / Houston for Asylum Office

Our client retained us in September 2014 to help him with his asylum case. He is from Saudi Arabia living in Dallas Texas. He is scared to go back home to Saudi Arabia, fearing that he will be persecuted on account of his social group as gay / homosexual.

We helped him prepare his asylum application, going over several drafts until his claim was as detailed as possible. Names, addresses, dates, and all possible issues relevant to his asylum claim were addressed. We also asked him to provide supporting documents corroborating his claim, some of which were letters from Saudi Arabia and friends in the U.S. who were part of his social group. Our firm also did some research on articles pertaining to his particular claim, and the type of persecution that members of his social group suffer in Saudi Arabia.

The asylum application was filed on October 22, 2014. On November 20, 2014, the CIS issued an interview notice for his asylum case, scheduled for December 8, 2014 in Houston, Texas. Prior to his interview, our office prepared him thoroughly for his case, going over practice interviews by phone to make sure he is able to address questions the asylum officer would ask. On December 8, 2014, attorney Sung Hee (Glen) Yu from our office accompanied our client at his interview in Houston Texas. The interview went well and our client was able to answer all questions accordingly. There were no requests for evidence prior to nor after the interview. Everything went smoothly.

On December 22, 2014, the CIS in Houston approved our client’s asylum case. He is now an asylee and will be eligible to apply for permanent resident status in one year. He also would obtain his work permit in about two weeks.

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Post image for Asylum Approval for Syrian Clients in Ohio at the Cleveland Immigration Court

CASE: Asylum in Immigration Court

CLIENT: Syrian

LOCATION: Cleveland Immigration Court

Our Syrian clients (husband and wife) came to the United States in August 2012. They are Christians who have lived in Syria, and they came to the United States since they were in fear in Syria.

With help from their previous attorney, our clients filed their I-589 asylum application to the USCIS in November 2012.  Our client was threatened and was in danger in Syria based on his religion. However, after the USCIS asylum interview, their asylum cases were referred to the Cleveland Immigration Court.  A Notice to Appear was issued and our clients were placed in removal proceedings. After they got the Notice to Appear and hearing notices for their Master Calendar hearing, they contacted and retained our firm in October 2013.

Our clients were scared to go back home to Syria, fearing that they will be persecuted based on their religion. While our clients were in Syria, our clients’ family members were kidnapped. Our client also received some threats.

We supplemented the asylum applications represented them in immigration court hearings. We also asked them to provide supporting documents corroborating their claim, some of which were a letter from their family members, colleagues and friends in Syria and in the United States.  Our firm also did some research on articles related to their claims, and the type of persecution they will experience in Syria if sent back.

Our clients’ individual hearing was scheduled on October 27, 2014 at the Cleveland Immigration Court. Attorney Sung Hee Yu from our firm prepared them extensively twice. He also represented our clients at their Individual Hearing.

During the hearing, our clients testified credibly as to their past persecution in Syria and likelihood of future persecution. After the hearing, the Immigration Judge granted asylum relief for our clients. They are now asylees who will get their work permits in two weeks and will be eligible to apply for permanent residency in one year.

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Post image for Withholding of Removal Approved for Cameroonian Client at the Memphis Immigration Court

CASE: Asylum, Withholding of Removal, and CAT in Immigration Court

CLIENT: Cameroonian

LOCATION: Memphis Immigration Court

Our Cameroonian client came to the United States in December 1999 on an F-1 student visa. In July 2001, he filed an asylum application to the USCIS, was interviewed by the USCIS, and later his case was referred to the Immigration Court.  Thereafter, a Notice to Appear was issued and our client was placed in removal proceedings. After he got the Notice to Appear, he appeared at his initial master calendar hearing at the Memphis Immigration Court with his previous attorney.

His removal proceedings were continued, but he could not appear at his individual hearing in April 2003 due to hospitalization.  Thus, the Court found him removable and ordered him removed in absentia.

Later, in April 2011, he filed Motion to Reopen with assistance of his previous immigration counsel.  However, this Motion to Reopen was denied by the Court in July 2011.

Thereafter, he contacted our office to determine whether he can file a Motion to Reopen again.  After consultation, we explained to him that the only way the Court can reopen his case is based on changed country conditions in Cameroon.  It is because our client’s second Motion to Reopen can be considered untimely filed and numerically barred.

Our client decided to retain our office on November 22, 2011 for a Motion to Reopen based on changed country conditions.

Under immigration law, if an applicant seeks to make an asylum claim and a final order of removal has been entered and the ninety-day filing deadline for motions to reopen has passed, the BIA and the majority of Circuit Courts have found that the applicant may only file the asylum application through a motion to reopen and only under the “changed country conditions” provision of 8 C.F.R. § 1003.23(b)(4)(i).  Thus, our office prepared the Motion to Reopen based on the changed country conditions in Cameroon.

On March 6, 2012, our office filed the Motion to Reopen with the Memphis Immigration Court.

W included a detailed affidavit regarding his involvement in a political activist group in Cameroon, and several affidavits from his fellow members who confirmed his involvement with the organization.  We claimed that the number of arrests and detentions of his political group member had recently escalated since his original removal hearing in 2003 resulting in changed country conditions.  We also attached a letter from a human rights officer in which he stated that he knew our client’s political involvement in Cameroon. Moreover, other supporting documents such as newspaper articles and a country report of Cameroon were submitted (24 exhibits).  On March 29, 2012, the DHS filed a Response in Opposition to our Motion.  Nevertheless, on May 2, 2012, the Memphis Immigration Court granted our motion and reopened our client’s case.

Once his case was  reopened, he retained our office again. Our attorney Sung Hee (Glen) Yu appeared at his master calendar hearing via telephonic appearance and his individual hearing was scheduled on September 29, 2014 at the Memphis Immigration Court.

Our client was persecuted and harmed in Cameroon based on his political opinion and movement.  Our client was scared to go back home to Cameroon, fearing that he will be persecuted based on his political opinion. Moreover, our client’s late father and his uncle were mistreated and harmed in Cameroon due to their political opinion as well.

We helped him file his asylum application and represented him in immigration court hearings. We also asked him to provide supporting documents corroborating his claim, some of which were a letter from his family, colleagues and friends in Cameroon. Our firm also did some research on articles related to his claim, and the type of persecution he will experience in Cameroon if sent back.

Our client’s individual hearing was scheduled on September 29, 2014 at the Memphis Immigration Court. Attorney Sung Hee Yu from our firm prepared him extensively. He also represented our client at his Individual Hearing at the Memphis Immigration Court.

Prior to the hearing, the Immigration Judge held a pre-trial conference with Attorney Yu and the DHS counsel. During the pre-trial conference, all of the possible issues were examined. At the conclusion of the conference, withholding of removal was granted.

After the hearing, the Immigration Judge granted Withholding of Removal for our client based on his persecution in Cameroon. His removal will be withheld and our client can get his Employment Authorization Document and will not be deported.

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Post image for Asylum Approval with CIS for Chinese Client in Cleveland Ohio

CASE: Asylum

CLIENT: Chinese

LOCATION: Cleveland, OH

Our client, a Chinese asylum seeker in Cleveland, OH, retained us on January 11, 2013 to help him with his asylum case. He came to the United States in September 2012 with a B-2 visitor’s visa from China. He came here with his wife and son who also came here on a B-2 visitor’s visa.  He wanted to seek asylum relief with the US Citizenship and Immigration Service.

While he was in China, he was persecuted and mistreated by the government based on his Christian faith and practice. He and his wife were also persecuted due to violation of the one child family planning policy as well. Our client was severely beaten and mistreated by the Chinese police in numerous occasions. He is scared to go back home to China, fearing that he will be persecuted again.

We helped him prepare for his asylum application, going over several drafts until his claim was as detailed as possible. Names, addresses, dates, and all possible issues relevant to his asylum claim were addressed. We also asked her to provide supporting documents corroborating his claims. Our firm also did some research on articles pertaining to his particular claim, and the type of persecution that Chinese Christians would suffer.

The asylum application was filed in March 5, 2013 which was within one year of his entry to the United States.  Thereafter, the CIS issued an interview notice for his asylum case, scheduled for December 18, 2013 at the Cleveland, OH USCIS Office. Prior to his interview, our office prepared him thoroughly for his case at our office to make sure he was able to address questions the asylum officer would ask. Attorney Sung Hee (Glen) Yu from our office also accompanied our client at his interview.

On April 30, 2014, the USCIS approved our client’s asylum case. He is now an asylee and will be eligible to apply for permanent resident status in one year.  His wife and son also became derivative asylees. He also would obtain his work permit in about two weeks.

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Post image for Asylum Approval Based on Christianity for Chinese Client at the Cleveland Immigration Court

CASE: Asylum in Immigration Court

CLIENT: Chinese

LOCATION: Cleveland Immigration Court

Our Chinese client came to the United States on a B-2 visa in September 2009. He was persecuted and harmed in China based on his religious beliefs and its related activities, so within one year of his entry (in October 2009), he filed an asylum application (Asylum, Withholding of Removal, and relief under the CAT) to the USCIS.

He was interviewed at the Asylum Office in Los Angeles, but his case was referred to an immigration judge in December 2009. The Notice to Appear was issued and our client was placed in removal proceedings. The USCIS thought that our client’s testimony was different from that of his written statement and referred the case to the Court.

The case was initiated at the Los Angeles Immigration Court. However, our client moved to Columbus, Ohio in 2011. After he moved to Columbus, OH, our client contacted our office in early April 2011, and eventually retained our office on April 11, 2011. Once retained, our office immediately filed a Motion to Change Venue which was eventually approved by the Los Angeles Immigration Court. Our client’s case was then transferred to Cleveland, OH.

Our client was scared to go back home to China, fearing that he will be persecuted based on his religious belief and his active participation in religious events which are considered anti-government activities.

While our client was in China, he attended numerous underground home church meetings. As a result, he was arrested and detained by Chinese police and experienced harm and mistreatment.

We helped him supplement his asylum application and represented him in his immigration court hearings. We also asked him to provide supporting documents corroborating his claim, some of which were letters family and church members in China, and documents related to his religious activities. Our firm also did some research on articles related to his claim, and the type of persecution he will experience in China if sent back.

Our client’s individual hearing was scheduled on March 3, 2014 at the Cleveland Immigration Court. Attorney JP Sarmiento from our firm prepared him extensively. He also represented our client at his Individual Hearing.

During the hearing, our client testified about his past persecution in China and the likelihood of future persecution. After the hearing, the Immigration Judge re-set the case for a decision hearing which was originally scheduled for September of this year. Nevertheless, on April 24, 2014, the Immigration Judge issued a written decision and granted asylum relief for our client. He is now an asylee who will get his work permit in a short period of time and will be eligible to apply for permanent residency in one year.

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Post image for Withholding of Removal Approved for Chinese Client at the Philadelphia Immigration Court

CASE: Asylum in Immigration Court

CLIENT: Chinese

LOCATION: Philadelphia Immigration Court

Our Chinese client came to the United States in January 2009 without inspection and admission. After that, he filed an asylum application in July 2009 to the USCIS, but his case was referred to the immigration court. Thereafter, a Notice to Appear was issued and our client was placed in removal proceedings. After he got the Notice to Appear, he appeared at his initial master calendar hearing at the Los Angeles Immigration Court with his previous attorney.

In July 2012, he moved to West Virginia from California. He contacted our office and asked us whether we can take his case. He retained our office on August 27, 2012.

We then filed a Change of Venue Motion to the Los Angeles Immigration Court which was later granted by the court. His venue was changed from Los Angeles, CA to Philadelphia, PA. Our attorney Glen Yu appeared at his master calendar hearings and his individual hearing was scheduled on March 28, 2014 at the Philadelphia Immigration Court.

Our client was persecuted and harmed in China based on his Christian belief. Our client was scared to go back home to China, fearing that he will be persecuted based on his religious belief. While he was in China, our client attended several home church meetings. As a result, he was arrested and detained by the Chinese police and he experienced harm and mistreatment in numerous occasions.

We helped him file his asylum application and represented him in immigration court hearings. We also asked him to provide supporting documents corroborating his claim, some of which were a letter from her family, colleagues and friends in China. Our firm also did some research on articles related to his claim, and the type of persecution he will experience in China if sent back.

Our client’s individual hearing was scheduled on March 28, 2014 at the Philadelphia Immigration Court. Attorney Sung Hee Yu from our firm prepared him extensively. He also represented our client at his Individual Hearing at the Philadelphia Immigration Court.

Prior to the hearing, Immigration Judge held a pre-trial conference with Attorney Yu and the DHS counsel. It was a 90-minute conference, and all of the possible issues were examined. At the conclusion of the conference, withholding of removal was granted.

After the hearing, the Immigration Judge granted Withholding of Removal for our client based on his past persecution in China. His removal will be withheld and our client can get his Employment Authorization Document and will not be deported.

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