slide
Success Stories
If you need help in any aspect of immigration law, feel free to contact our office. We invite you to view our success stories.
slide
From Our Clients
Please read our compiled reviews from the internet, from Google to AVVO, on what our clients have said about our firm.
slide
Marriage
One of the fastest and most common immigration cases are those based on marriage to a US Citizen.
slide
Family and Relative Immigration
From immigration of children, parents, siblings, to cases involving 245(i), CSPA, and the death of a petitioner, we are here to help.
slide
H-1B
H-1B petitions for employment in specialty occupations, from computer analysts, engineers, nurse managers, accountants, architects, doctors, feel free to contact us.
slide
Asylum
Past persecution or fear of future persecution on account of politics, race, religion, social group, or nationality. Let us guide you in the asylum application process.
Post image for I-130 I-485 Marriage Based Petition and Adjustment of Status Approval for Indonesian Client in Cleveland Ohio

CASE: Marriage-Based I-130 Petition and I-485 Adjustment of Status

CLIENT: Indonesian

LOCATION: Cleveland, OH

Our Indonesian client came to the United States on an H-2B visa in August 2006. Later, he married a U.S. Citizen in March 2014 and retained our office on April 8, 2014 for his adjustment of status application.

Our firm prepared and filed the I-130 Petition and I-485 Adjustment of Status Application on April 18, 2014.  Everything went smoothly and the receipt notices, fingerprint appointment, and work permits all came on time. Prior to the interview, we thoroughly prepared our clients in our office.

On July 17, 2014, our client was interviewed at the Cleveland, OH USCIS.  Attorney JP Sarmiento from our office accompanied them as well. On the same day, his green card application was approved.

{ 0 comments }

Post image for I-130 I-485 Green Card Marriage Approval for Visa Waiver Entrant Korean Client in Dayton Ohio

Case: I-130/I-485

Applicant/Beneficiary – Korean

Location: Dayton, OH

Our client entered the United States in January 2014 from South Korea under the visa waiver program. She came here to visit her U.S. citizen boyfriend (now her husband) for a couple months. As a Visa Waiver Entrant, she was only authorized to remain in the United States for 90 days.

Later, in February, our client and her U.S. citizen boyfriend married in the United States. Her husband contacted our office, and they retained us on March 21, 2014.

One main issue in her green card application through marriage was the fact that she came to the United States under the visa waiver program.   As our office wrote in our previous success story with a similar issue,  under the visa waiver program, citizens of certain countries can enter the U.S. for 90 days without a visa with the condition that the visitor waives his or her right to contest removal (other than on the basis of asylum).  The “no-contest” provision of the Visa Waiver Program is fundamental; if someone could enter under the VWP and then contest removability; it would defeat the whole purpose of the Program which is to make it easy for certain nationals to come to the United States to visit and then leave without all the red-tape involved in visa issuance.

Our office filed the I-130 Petition and I-485 Adjustment of Status Application on March 31, 2014.  Our office requested the CIS to exercise favorable discretion in granting adjustment of status and argued that the application was filed before her authorized period of stay expired. Everything went smoothly and the receipt notices, fingerprint appointment, and work permit all came on time. Prior to the interview, we thoroughly prepared our clients. On July 17, 2014, our client was interviewed at the Cincinnati, Ohio USCIS Field Office.  Attorney Sung Hee (Glen) Yu accompanied them at the interview as well.  Despite the visa waiver issue, on the same day of the interview, the USCIS approved her green card application.  Now, our client is a green card holder.

{ 0 comments }

Post image for Immigrant Visa Approval After 601A Provisional Hardship Waiver for Chinese Client in Cleveland Ohio

CASE:   Immigrant Visa / I-601A Hardship Waiver of Inadmissibility

APPLICANT / BENEFICIARY: Chinese

LOCATION: Cleveland, OH / Guangzhou, China (Visa Interview)

Our client came to the United States from China in March 2000 without inspection and admission. When she made her entry to the U.S., she was only 15 year old.

She married her U.S. citizen husband in 2006 and they have a U.S. citizen child together. Through our office, she applied for deferred action (I-821D) and the USCIS approved her application on December 13, 2012.

After her I-821D was approved, her U.S. Citizen husband filed an I-130 petition for her on February 4, 2013. This I-130 petition was approved on March 25, 2013.

However, our client cannot file for adjustment of status application due to her overstay. She thus had a ground of inadmissibility. She needed a waiver of inadmissibility to become a green card holder.

Under current law, immediate relatives of U.S. citizens who are not eligible to adjust status in the United States must travel abroad and obtain an immigrant visa. Individuals who have accrued more than 180 days of unlawful presence while in the United States must obtain a waiver of inadmissibility to overcome the unlawful presence bars under section 212(a)(9)(B) of the Immigration and Nationality Act before they can return to the United States

Last year, the USCIS announced of new policy called the provisional unlawful presence waiver. Beginning March 4, 2013, certain immigrant visa applicants who are spouses, children and parents of U.S. citizens (immediate relatives) can apply for provisional unlawful presence waivers before they leave the United States. The provisional unlawful presence waiver process allows individuals, who only need a waiver of inadmissibility for unlawful presence, to apply for a waiver in the United States.

The new process is expected to shorten the time U.S. citizens are separated from their immediate relatives while those family members are obtaining immigrant visas to become lawful permanent residents of the United States.

INA § 212(i) provides for a discretionary waiver of the entry without inspection inadmissibility ground. To qualify for the waiver, the alien must establish that his or her US Citizen spouse would suffer extreme hardship if the alien were denied admission. INA § 212(i)(1). In addition to the equities presented, the USCIS may consider the nature of the inadmissibility ground.

There is a seminal BIA case that deals with this waiver.  In Matter of Cervantes, 22 I & N Dec. 560 (BIA 1999), the BIA identified the factors to be considered in determining whether a qualifying relative would suffer extreme hardship if the alien were denied admission.  Those factors include: the presence of LPR or USC family ties both within and outside the United States; the conditions in the country to which the qualifying relative would relocate and the extent of the qualifying relative’s ties to that country; the financial impact of departure from the United States; and significant conditions of health, particularly when tied to the unavailability of suitable medical care in the country to which the qualifying relative would relocate.

Our client’s I-601A application had a good chance since our client’s U.S. Citizen husband suffers from a great degree of psychological hardship. Also, his U.S. citizen mother (our client’s mother-in-law) has a mental disease which requires special attention from our client’s husband. In the I-601A brief and supporting documents, our office included extensive medical reports of her husband.  We argued that if she was removed from the United States, extreme hardship to her husband is clearly foreseeable and evident.  Her husband has ongoing psychological hardships and he would not be able to take care of his own needs and the bulk of their family chores, most importantly taking care of their infant children. Also, it would be extremely difficult for him to get the same level of therapy and satisfactory access to medical services in China in case he joins our client there.

In our brief, we also argued that our client and her husband have maintained strong family ties in the United States, that her husband will have difficulty in finding the same level of employment in China, that our client has good employment in the United States, and that his U.S. citizen child and her husband will face extreme financial and emotional difficulties if he is removed.

On October 3, 2013, we filed the I-601A waiver application which included the brief in support, her husband’s extensive psychological examination records, and other documents that demonstrated hardship to her husband if she is removed from the United States.

Eventually, her I-601A waiver was approved on January 27, 2014.

Once her I-601A waiver was approved, she retained our office again for her immigrant visa processing. Our office prepared and filed her immigrant visa application on May 1, 2014. On June 13, 2014, the U.S. Embassy in Guangzhou, China informed our office that they scheduled an immigrant visa interview for our client. Our client went back to China to appear at her interview on July 15, 2014. On July 15, 2014, our client appeared at her immigrant visa interview at the Consulate, and the Consulate officer approved her immigrant visa on the same day.

Now, our client can come back to the United States with an approved immigrant visa and she will get her green card in a mail within two weeks of her entry to the United States.

{ 0 comments }

Post image for I751 Approval for Indian Client in Cleveland, OH with Waiver of Joint Filing Requirement due to Divorce

CASE: I-751 / Waiver of the Joint Waiver Requirement

APPLICANT: Indian

LOCATION: Cleveland, OH

Our client contacted our office in early February of 2014 regarding her potential I-751 filing. She came to the United States from India and she married a U.S. Citizen (her ex-husband) in September 2011.

Through her marriage, she was able to obtain a 2-year conditional green card in May of 2012. Thus, her conditional residency terminated in May 2014.

Unfortunately, their marriage ended in April 2013. Our client experienced a lot of difficulties during her marriage with her ex-husband. Thus, our client could not file the I-751 application jointly with her ex-husband.

Once retained, we requested a waiver because our client entered into the marriage in good faith, but the marriage was terminated through divorce or annulment before they can file a joint petition. We focused on the supporting documents that she can show and helped her draft an extensive affidavit about their marriage, and why it ended the way it did.

On February 25, 2014, our office filed the I-751 application with various supporting documents (over 9 exhibits and an affidavit over 3 pages) to demonstrate our client’s bona fide marriage with her ex-husband.

In June 2014, the USCIS scheduled an I-751 interview for our client.

Prior to the interview, our office thoroughly prepared our client at our office and informed her of potential issues at the interview.

On July 10, 2014, our client was interviewed for her I-751 application at the USCIS Cleveland, OH Field Office.  Attorney JP Sarmiento from our office accompanied our client.  The interview was very extensive.  Nevertheless, the USCIS approved our client’s I-751 application on the same day. Now, she has her ten-year green card.

{ 0 comments }

Post image for I-130 and I-485 Marriage Based Petition and Adjustment of Status Approval for Sri Lankan Client in Cleveland, OH

CASE: Marriage-Based Adjustment of Status
CLIENT: Sri Lankan
LOCATION: Cleveland, OH

Our Sri Lankan client came to the United States on an F-1 student visa in January 2013. Later, he married a U.S. Citizen in October 2013 and retained our office on April 3, 2014 for his adjustment of status application.  Our firm prepared and filed the I-130 Petition and Adjustment of Status Application on April 15, 2014.  Everything went smoothly and the receipt notices, fingerprint appointment, and work permits all came on time. Prior to the interview, we thoroughly prepared our clients in our office. On July 1, 2014, our client was interviewed at the Cleveland, OH USCIS.  Attorney Sung Hee (Glen) Yu from our office accompanied them as well. On the same day, his green card application was approved.

{ 0 comments }

Post image for I-751 Removal of Conditions Approval for Jordanian Client in Ohio

CASE: I-751

APPLICANT: Jordanian

LOCATION: Ohio

Our client contacted our office in December of 2013 regarding her I-751 application.

She is from Jordan and married a U.S. citizen in November 2010. Through her marriage, she obtained a 2-year conditional green card in December of 2011.  Her conditional residency terminated in March 2014.

To comply with immigration requirements, our client and her husband had to file an I-751 Joint Petition to Remove Conditions. She retained our office again on December 20, 2013 and our office prepared an I-751 application for our client with a lot of exhibits.

On January 2, 2014, our office filed an I-751 application to the USCIS with a birth certificate of their son, joint bank statements, joint tax records and photos of our client and her husband to demonstrate the bona fideness of their marriage.

We then got a receipt notice and the fingerprint notice was issued two weeks later.  However, USCIS issued a Request for Evidence (RFE) on May 6, 2014.  The USCIS requested our client to submit more documentary evidence to prove the bona fide nature of her marriage with her husband. In response to the RFE, our office prepared the response and gathered more joint documentary evidence to demonstrate the bona fide nature of our client’s marriage with her husband during last two years. We filed the RFE response on May 30, 2014 to USCIS.

Eventually, on July 1, 2014, the USCIS approved our client’s I-751 application and our client received her 10-year green card.

{ 0 comments }

Post image for Fiancé  Petitioner and Visa Approved for Petitioner from Ohio and Nigerian Beneficiary in Spain

CASE: Fiancé Visa

PETITIONER: US Citizen in Ohio

BENEFICIARY: Nigerian Beneficiary in Spain

PETITION FILED: November 26, 2013

PETITION APPROVED: February 4, 2014

K-1 VISA APPROVED: June 20, 2014

Our client, a US Citizen Petitioner, met her Nigerian fiancé in March 2007 in Nigeria.  Over time, they started their relationship, and she went to Spain multiple times in 2012 and in 2013 after her fiancé moved to Spain.  When she visited his fiancé in July 2012, her fiancé proposed to her. Months after his proposal, she retained our firm to file a fiancé petition for him.

After retention, we informed our client about the necessary supporting documents to demonstrate the bona fide nature of their relationship. Our client retained our office on October 14, 2013. We helped her and her fiancé draft letters in support of the fiancé petition, and we filed the petition on November 26, 2013.

On February 4, 2014, the I-129F fiancé petition was approved. On June 20, 2014, our client’s fiancé appeared at the U.S. Embassy in Madrid, Spain for his K-1 visa interview. The interview went well, and on the same day, the U.S. Embassy issued his K-1 visa.

{ 0 comments }

Post image for Green Card Approval After Final Order, Motion to Reopen on I-130 Approval, and Termination of Proceedings for Peruvian Client in Cleveland Ohio

CASE: Adjustment of Status (I-485) / BIA Motion to Reopen and Termination of Removal Proceedings with an Approved I-130 Petition

CLIENT: Peruvian

LOCATION: Cleveland, OH

Our client is from Peru who came to the U.S. on a B-2 visitor’s visa in July 2002 with his family. When he came to the United States, he was an only a minor.

Later, his father filed for asylum and withholding of removal, but the Immigration Judge in Cleveland denied all applications for relief in February 2010. Accordingly, our client’s asylum relief (our client was a derivate applicant of his father’s asylum application) was denied as well.

His father filed an appeal to the BIA, but in May 2012, the Board affirmed the Immigration Judge’s findings and dismissed the appeal. Unfortunately, our client’s father was deported soon after the BIA appeal was dismissed.

Our client remained in the United States despite the final order of removal. He was under order of supervision.

He married his current U.S. citizen wife in September 2012, and he inquired on whether he has any viable option for his immigration status.  After careful review, our office determined that we can file a Request to Join in a Motion to Reopen based on the I-130 approval and Bo Cooper’s May 17, 2001 Memorandum. Our client retained our office on September 11, 2012.

Once retained, our client’s wife filed the I-130 petition for our client on September 18, 2012. Our office prepared and filed the petition. The I-130 interview was scheduled and prior to the interview, we thoroughly prepared our clients at our office. On March 5, 2013, our client was interviewed at the Cleveland, Ohio USCIS office. Attorney Sung Hee (Glen) Yu from our office accompanied them as well. Eventually, on April 17, 2013, the I-130 petition was approved.

While the I-130 was pending, our office also filed a Request to Join in a Motion to Reopen and Terminate to the Cleveland DHS office on October 1, 2012. Our office prepared an extensive brief along with multiple supporting documents to request a favorable exercise of DHS’s discretion on this case. We argued that DHS should consider the following factors as set forth in Bo Cooper’s May 17, 2001 Memorandum: (1) whether adjustment of status was available at the prior hearing; (2) whether the alien is statutorily eligible for adjustment of status; and (3) whether the alien merits a favorable exercise of discretion. Bo Cooper, Motions to Reopen for Consideration of Adjustment of Status (May 17, 2001). In considering these factors, as delineated in William J. Howard’s October 24, 2005, Memorandum, “Where a motion to reopen for adjustment of status… is filed on behalf of an alien with substantial equities, no serious criminal or immigration violations, and who is legally eligible to be granted relief except that the motion is beyond the 90-day limitation contained in 8 C.F.R. § 1003.23, strongly consider exercising prosecutorial discretion and join in this motion to reopen to permit the alien to pursue such relief to the immigration court.” William J. Howard, Prosecutorial Discretion (October 24, 2005).

Our office argued that if our client’s case is reopened, he will be prima facie eligible to adjust his status. Our client has been living in the United States since 2002, has no criminal record, was a minor at the time of the entry to the U.S., and has an approved I-130 petition.

As a result, the DHS office agreed to join in our Motion to Reopen and Terminate. The DHS filed the joint motion to the BIA in September 2013. Finally, the BIA ordered our client’s case to be reopened and terminated our client’s case on November 26, 2013. Once his case was terminated he retained our office again for his I-485 adjustment of status application.

Our firm prepared and filed the Adjustment of Status Application and the Employment Authorization Document on February 24, 2014.  Everything went smoothly and the receipt notices, fingerprint appointment, and work permits all came on time.

Prior to the interview, we thoroughly prepared our client at our office. On June 24, 2014, our client was interviewed at the Cleveland, OH USCIS.  Attorney Sung Hee (Glen) Yu from our office also accompanied our client as well. On the same day, his green card application was approved.

{ 0 comments }

Post image for Despite Living Separately, Marriage to US Citizen I-130 and 485 Approval for Ghanaian Client in Maryland with Spouse in Ohio at Cleveland CIS

CASE: Marriage-Based Adjustment of Status

CLIENT: Ghanaian

LOCATION: Cleveland, OH

Our client came to the United States in September 2001 with an A-2 visa (The A-2 diplomatic visa is a nonimmigrant visa which allows foreign accredited officials, not in the diplomatic category, to enter into the U.S. to engage in official activities of their government) from Ghana. Since then, she has maintained her A-2 status, finished her school, and she is currently working as a nurse in the United States.

She married a U.S. Citizen in July 2013 and retained our office on October 25, 2013 for her adjustment of status application. They were not living together but based on our conversation, the marriage was bona fide. The US Citizen lived in Ohio, the beneficiary lived in Maryland.

Our firm prepared and filed the I-130 Petition and I-485 Adjustment of Status Application on November 8, 2013.  Everything went smoothly and the receipt notices, fingerprint appointment, and work permits all came on time. We also requested that the interview be held in Cleveland Ohio.

Prior to the interview, we thoroughly prepared our clients through conference calls. On June 9, 2014, our client was interviewed at the Cleveland, Ohio USCIS.  Attorney Sung Hee (Glen) Yu from our office also accompanied our client as well. On June 23, 2014, her green card application was approved.

{ 0 comments }

Post image for I-751 Removal of Conditions Approval for Surinamese Client in Cleveland Ohio

CASE: I-751

APPLICANT: Surinamese

LOCATION: Cleveland, OH

Our client contacted our office in January of 2014 regarding her I-751 application.

She is from Suriname and she married a U.S. citizen in 2011. Through her marriage, she obtained a 2-year conditional green card in May of 2012.  Her conditional residency terminated in May 2014.

To comply with immigration requirements, our client and her husband had to file an I-751 Joint Petition to Remove Conditions on her permanent residency. She retained our office on January 20, 2014 and our office prepared and filed an I-751 application with bona fide marriage evidence.

On February 4, 2014, our office filed an I-751 application to the USCIS with multiple affidavits from her friends and family members, joint insurance policies, joint tax records, joint property ownership document, and photos of our client and her husband to demonstrate the bona fideness of their marriage.

There was no RFE or interview request for our client’s I-751 application. As a result, on June 19, 2014, the USCIS approved our client’s I-751 application and our client received her 10-year green card.

{ 0 comments }