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Broad Outline of Senate Immigration Agreement Emerge

by JP Sarmiento on April 15, 2013

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Below are six key points regarding the Senate’s priorities in immigration reform.

  • Fortifying the borders and other domestic enforcement measures for the next 10 years.
  • Continuous surveillance of close to a hundred percent of the United States border and 90 percent effectiveness of enforcement in high-risk sectors.
  • Provide $3 billion for the Department of Homeland Security to come up and carry out a five-year security plan. While the officials are preparing to present the plan within six months, there would be no room for any provisional legal status for any illegal immigrant.
  • Worker verification system to be required, mandatory for all employers within five years.
  • DHS also asked to create an electronic system to ensure that foreigners leave when their visas expire.
  • For those who meet all the requirements and background checks, a provisional status for 10 years will be given. This allows them to work and travel but not to remain permanently; only then will they be allowed to apply for green cards.

Source: The New York Times

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